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Dear Colleague,

I am pleased to send you the first issue of IGLSS Abstracts. IGLSS
Abstracts will keep you stay up-to-date on the latest social science and
policy-related research on gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered issues.
I hope you will consider sending us descriptions of your conference
papers, working papers, and recently published journal articles to include
in future issues. Get valuable feedback and help us develop a community of
scholars.

I hope you will find this service useful! For information on subscribing
or unsubscribing, please see the bottom of the message.
Yours,
Lee Badgett
President and Acting Executive Director,
Institute for Gay and Lesbian Strategic Studies

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I G L S S  A B S T R A C T S
October 1999
Vol. 1 No. 1

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Editor:
Professor Marieka Klawitter
University of Washington
marieka@u.washington.edu

IGLSS ABSTRACTS is an electronic distribution service for descriptions of social science and policy-related research papers on gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered people.


T A B L E  O F  C O N T E N T S
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(1) "Public Opinion and State Sodomy Laws"
         Gregory B. Lewis
         Andrew Young School of Public Policy
         Georgia State University

(2) "Discrimination against Lesbian and Gay Teachers: The Role of Public Opinion"
         Gregory B. Lewis
         Andrew Young School of Public Policy
         Georgia State University

(3) "Tolerance, Taboos, and Gender Identity: The Occupational Distribution of
Lesbians and Gay Men"
         M. V. Lee Badgett
         Economics Department
         University of Massachusetts
        

A B S T R A C T S
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(1) "PUBLIC OPINION AND STATE SODOMY LAWS"

BY:
GREGORY B. LEWIS

ABSTRACT:
Unlike the legislative history on most gay rights issues, sodomy law repeals started and ended early. Twenty-two states repealed their laws by 1980 and only four more did so in the 1980s and 1990s, when both the lesbian and gay movement and public support for gay rights seemed stronger. This paper explores the role of public opinion in explaining the anomalous pattern of sodomy law repeal. First, I briefly discuss the history of criminalization and decriminalization of oral and anal sex. Second, I examine trends in public opinion on homosexuality and gay rights. Public attitudes toward legalizing gay sex do not follow the clear upward trends of attitudes on civil liberties and equal employment opportunities but more strongly resemble the generally stable disapproval of gay sex. Third, using 17 years of General Social Survey (GSS) data on whether homosexual relations are "always wrong" and 15 additional surveys on whether they should be legal, I develop regional and state measures of public opinion, examine whether the differences can be explained by the demographic characteristics of their citizens, and investigate the relationship between state public opinion and the current legal status of same-sex sexual relations. States vary substantially in their support for legalizing homosexual relations, and state public opinion is at least moderately related to sodomy law repeal.

(2) "DISCRIMINATION AGAINST LESBIAN AND GAY TEACHERS: THE ROLE OF PUBLIC OPINION"

BY:
GREGORY B. LEWIS

ABSTRACT:
Although a sizeable majority of Americans have accepted the general principle of equal treatment for lesbians and gay men in the workplace at least since the late 1970s, objections to homosexuals as elementary and high school teachers have impeded passage of laws to prohibit employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. As a majority has only favored hiring gay elementary school teachers since the mid-1990s, the country seems poised for a major expansion in the number of nondiscrimination laws. Using 15 surveys covering nearly 25,000 respondents, I develop state measures of public opinion on lesbian and gay teachers; show that all 13 states (including the District of Columbia) that have ever passed nondiscrimination laws are among the 16 states where public opinion most strongly supports the employment of lesbian and gay teachers; and identify several states likely to pass such laws in coming years. Then, using an enlarged data set of over 50,000 respondents, I show that support is strongest among the young, the better educated, the less religious (especially the less fundamentalist), Democrats, independents, and women. Support is increasing in every group, but more quickly among Democrats than Republicans, women than men, and whites than blacks.

Contact: Gregory B. Lewis
Email: glewis@gsu.edu
Postal:
  Andrew Young School of Policy Studies
  Georgia State University
  Atlanta, GA 30303-3083
Phone: (404) 651-4443

(3) "TOLERANCE, TABOOS, AND GENDER IDENTITY: THE OCCUPATIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF
LESBIANS AND GAY MEN"

BY:
M. V. LEE BADGETT

ABSTRACT:
Data from the General Social Survey and the National Health and Social Life Survey reveal very different occupational distributions for gay men and lesbians when compared with heterosexual men and women. This paper offers three theoretically distinct reasons to predict differences in the occupational distribution by sexual orientation: factors related to employers' behavior (discrimination) and influences on gay employees' behavior (choices of occupation based on coworkers' attitudes or on gender nonconformity). Two tests, a multinomial logit model of occupational position and an equation predicting the proportion of women in a respondent's occupation, both support the hypothesis that lesbians and gay men make occupational choices that do not conform to existing gender patterns

Contact: M. V. Lee Badgett
Email: lbadgett@econs.umass.edu
Postal:
  Economics Department
  Thompson Hall
  University of Massachusetts
  Amherst, MA 010003
Phone: (413) 545-0159
Fax: (413) 545-2921


I N F O R M A T I O N
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ACQUIRING PAPERS
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Authors should submit descriptions of papers and the authors' contact information (name, address, and email) to abstracts@iglss.org. Descriptions of papers should be no longer than 250 words. The materials will be reviewed for completeness and topical appropriateness before acceptance and distribution. In general, descriptions should be different from the short abstracts contained as part of the paper to avoid copyright problems with journal publication.

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ABOUT IGLSS
The Institute for Gay and Lesbian Strategic Studies is a nonprofit think tank. The IGLSS mission is to inform public debates through research, analysis, and education in order to create an equal and integrated society for people of all sexual orientations and gender identifications. The Institute conducts research and analysis on policy-related topics such as marriage and employment discrimination and on questions of strategic value to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/transsexual communities.

The Institute for Gay and Lesbian Strategic Studies
P.O. Box 2603
Amherst, MA 01004-2603
(413) 577-0145 (voice)
(413) 545-2921 (fax)
www.iglss.org

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Felicity Lanier
Institute for Gay and Lesbian Strategic Studies
P.O. Box 2603
Amherst, MA 01004-2603
lanier@iglss.org
http://www.iglss.org
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